Ketone Supplement

Ketone Supplements

What are Ketone Supplements?

Ketone supplements are products that can be taken that will increase ketone production. There are supplements such as coconut oil that contain Medium Chain Triglyceride (MCT) that convert to ketones (Beta-Hydroxybutyrate) in the body. Often times consuming Coconut / MCT oil can cause some GI discomfort until the body is efficient at processing the fats.

A new technology has recently been made available to the public that allows us to drink ketones / Beta-Hydroxybutyrate (BHB) that within 30 mins will increase ketone levels to a therapeutic level with little if any GI discomfort. These supplements are exogenous ketones, meaning we are putting ketones into our body instead of relying on our bodies to create its own ketones.

Both of these ketone supplements have been found to be beneficial. I currently consume both and recommend them both highly. I’m extremely excited and passionate about the advancements in the exogenous ketone supplementation.

Ketone Supplements I Recommend

Keto//OS by Pruvit

Pruvit Ketone SupplementPruvit offers 3 different flavors of their ketone supplement (Keto//OS).

KETO//OS contains a specifically engineered ratio of proprietary ketone mineral salts that provide a high-energy fuel compound without having to incorporate an energy-restricted diet. KETO//OS contains a perfect ratio of ketones for optimal protein synthesis and a high fiber based MCT formulation for sustained nutrient energy and digestive health and cognition.

My Personal Review & Thoughts of Keto//OS

 Looking for more energy, mental clarity, fat loss, or just better overall health? Take this for 30, 60, 90 days and feel amazing!

Order today and work directly with me and my team!

MCT Oil

ketone supplement“MCTs” are medium-chain triglycerides, a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits, ranging from improved cognitive function to better weight management.Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs — roughly 62–65 percent of the fatty acids in coconut oil are MCTs.

Alzheimer’s disease now affects more than 5.5 million Americans

First Edition of first book by Mary Newport MD - Our story, the science of ketones and how to incorporate coconut oil and MCT oil into the diet. ...

View on Facebook

Father, Husband, Son, Uncle, Grandfather, Alzheimer's victim ...

View on Facebook

Coconut oil helps Alzheimer's, dementia, ALS, MS updated their profile picture. ...

View on Facebook

Coconut oil helps Alzheimer's, dementia, ALS, MS shared a link. ...

View on Facebook

RESPONSE TO AHA ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON DIETARY FATS AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
By Mary T. Newport, M.D.
June 21, 2017 - for more information on coconut oil and ketones please see my website at www.coconutketones.com.

From Mary T. Newport, MD: The media has irresponsibly taken viral a fragment of information purporting that coconut oil may be bad for your heart from an article published in the medical journal "Circulation" 2017, 135:e1-24, as a presidential advisory committee report from the AHA, "Dietary Fats and Cardiovascular Disease". The four "core studies" this committee relied on were all conducted in the 1950s, were relatively small groups of men only in three of the four studies, were conducted in populations that almost certainly were not consuming coconut oil on any regular basis, and were studies comparing diets with ANIMAL saturated fats to diets with polyunsaturated fats. Animal and human fat is well known to store hormones, pesticides, antibiotics and other environmental substances, which could be a factor in heart disease, whereas vegetable fats such as coconut oil would not be so likely to contain these potentially harmful substances. The authors do not mention whether age and smoking were controlled for in these studies; smoking, which was very prevalent in the 1950s compared to the 2010's is a major contributor to heart disease. The raw numbers of how many people in each group had cardiac events was not presented, making the summaries difficult to evaluate. The clincher in this article is that they state on page e13, under the section on coconut oil, "Clinical trials that compared direct effects on CVD [cardiovascular disease] of coconut oil and other dietary oils have not been reported." They rely on studies of individual saturated fatty acids that show a miniscule increase in LDL (co called "bad") cholesterol but rationalize away a similar small increase in HDL ("good")and an improved LDL to HDL ratio. For example, lauric acid (50% of coconut oil) resulted in a less than 1 mg/dl point increase in both LDL and HDL cholesterol, with typical LDL values ranging from less than 100 to 160 mg/dl. Could a change of less than 1 mg/dl really have that much impact? In addition, the problem here is that natural fats such as coconut oil and even lard do not come as individual fatty acids but rather combinations of many fatty acids which may balance each other out. Completely ignored in this report are the saturated fats in coconut oil known as medium chain triglycerides that could balance out the longer chain fats. Coconut oil also contains some mono- and polyunsaturated fats. One of the important details that the AHA is missing here is that 70% of the saturated fats in coconut oil are medium chain triglycerides (C6 through C12, lauric acid) which are either converted to ketones or burned immediately as fuel by muscle and other organs and not stored as fat. Lauric acid has some properties of medium chain and longer chain fatty acids. Ketones come from breakdown of fat and provide an alternative fuel to the brain and most other organs during starvation or fasting or to cells that are insulin resistant. In a recent study conducted in Japan, lauric acid was found to potently stimulate ketone production in astrocytes in cultures; astrocytes are brain cells that nourish other brain cells. By comparison, butter, lard and animal fat contain minimal medium chain triglycerides and they are not found in soybean, olive, corn, safflower and most other oils. There are hundreds of studies of potential benefits of coconut oil; for example, lauric acid, which is a medium chain triglyceride and about 50% of coconut oil, is antimicrobial - there are numerous studies showing that lauric acid kills many bacteria, viruses, fungi like candida and protozoa. A few small cholesterol studies looking at coconut oil were conducted decades ago in animals or a few men over short term and used hydrogenated coconut oil - any hydrogenated oil will increase cholesterol. Also, the diets were deficient in omega-3 fatty acids which can also increase cholesterol levels. There are studies of entire populations for whom coconut oil provides 1/3 to 2/3 of the diet showing that they were of normal height and weight, had normal blood pressure, triglycerides and cholesterol levels at all ages. The committee surmises that people who eat saturated fats likely have other bad eating habits without any proof. These days, the people who embrace coconut oil are likely embracing healthier foods as well and a healthier lifestyle in general and eating fish and/or taking omega-3 fats, which weren’t on the radar in the 1950s when the so-called “core studies” for this report were conducted.
The folks in the AHA and other organizations who perpetuate these myths about coconut oil need to really do their homework and learn more about medium chain triglycerides and study the other beneficial effects of coconut oil, which they choose to ignore. The bottom line that came out of their lengthy report is that “coconut oil is bad for your heart”, which has now been perpetuated by media who jumped on this conclusion that is not even based on direct research of coconut oil and heart disease. This message has gone viral worldwide. The impact of this could take a devastating toll on the economies of countries that produce coconut oil, mostly made up of individual farmers and their families trying to make a living. These economies were devastated in the 1960s and have been slowly recovering from the initial similar AHA statement on saturated fats in 1961 based on the same four “core studies". It is irresponsible and unconscionable for this advisory committee to make such sweeping claims without direct proof that coconut oil causes heart disease.
...

View on Facebook